The Louisiana Classicist

March 19, 2012

guest speaker Georgia Irby @ LSU

Filed under: announcement — Ann E. M. Ostrom @ 7:45 pm
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a bit of news from Kris Fletcher (LSU)

Albert Watanabe has arranged for Professor Georgia Irby to speak at LSU on Wednesday, March 28th at 4 o’clock PM in 139 Allen Hall on “Mapping Vergil: Cartography and Geography in the Aeneid.”

Dr. Irby is currently an Associate Professor of Classical Studies at the College of William and Mary, but is known to many of you from her time as an instructor at LSU (1998-2002). She has published on a wide variety of topics, including religion, science and natural history in the ancient world, some of which studies have provided the background for this talk, in which, examining the ‘Aeneid’ in the context of Graeco-Roman scientific geography (Eratosthenes, Strabo, etc.), Professor Irby explores Vergil’s seamless manipulation of geography to enhance overarching themes of this great epic. Please join us for this event, and pass on our invitation to your colleagues and students.

This talk will also serve as the informal kick-off to the Annual Meeting of the Classical Association of the Middle West and South, which LSU will be hosting from Wednesday the 28th through Saturday the 31st.

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October 7, 2010

LSU Student talk

Filed under: meetings — Ann E. M. Ostrom @ 8:58 am
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Eta Sigma Phi (Alpha Omega chapter) Prytanis and Students for the Promotion of Antiquity Praetor (Parliamentarian) James Hamilton will deliver an interesting lecture entitled,”The Disguise of Debt: Misargyrides as the Embodiment of Philolaches’ Debt in the ‘Mostellaria’.” He is performing this reading in advance of his presentation at the CAMWS Southern Section meeting in October.

This talk is free and open to the public, and will take place Thursday, 14 October, at 6:30pm in 324 Hodges Hall on the LSU campus.

Following Mr. Hamilton’s talk, SPA and Eta Sigma Phi will celebrate Vergil’s birthday, complete with cake, readings from the great man’s works, and Classical Pictionary.

his bust from the entrance to his tomb

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