The Louisiana Classicist

April 22, 2015

Annual Meeting of LCA and Special Guest Lecture

Filed under: announcement,meetings — Ann E. M. Ostrom @ 6:03 am
Tags: , , , ,

Two announcements from Graham Waddill, Secretary-Treasurer of the LCA:

First, a guest lecturer at LSU on Thursday, 23 April at 4:30:

DEPARTMENT
 OF
 FOREIGN 
LANGUAGES
 AND 
LITERATURES
PRESENTS
 A 
LECTURE 
BY
SALVADOR
 BARTERA
THE
 ANNALS
 OF
 TACITUS:
FROM
 OBSCURITY
 TO 
BESTSELLER
April
 23, 
2015,
 4:30
234
 PRESCOTT
 HALL

Abstract: This
 lecture 
will 
discuss 
the 
tradition
 of 
Tacitus’ 
text 
(mainly 
the 
Annals),
 as 
it 
survived and
was
 “rediscovered” 
in
 the 
Renaissance,
 explaining
 how
 and
 why
 we 
call
 it
 Annals,
 divide
 it 
in the
 way
 we
 do, 
etc. 
It
 will
 also 
present
 some 
examples
 of 
interpretive 
issues 
that
 made
 the
 Annals popular 
but
 at 
the
 same
 time
 “dangerous”
 in
 the 
late 
Renaissance,
 when 
the
 Annals 
were
 used both
 as 
a
 “guide 
to 
tyranny” 
and 
the 
opposite,
 the
 so‐called
 red
 and 
black
 Tacitus.

Dr.
 Bartera 
is 
Assistant
 Professor 
of 
Classics,
 Department
 of
 Classical
 and
 Modern
 Languages
 and Literatures,
 at
 Mississippi
 State
 University.

The second, to remind our members of the LCA meeting on Saturday, 25 April, on the third floor of Hodges Hall on the LSU campus. The agenda will be:

9:00-9:30 Registration & Light refreshments

9:30-10:30 Speakers

  • Christopher Caterine (Tulane) will be speaking on “A Minor Inconvenience: Cato the Younger and the Cognomen ‘Uticensis.'”
  • Kris Fletcher (LSU) will be speaking on “Using University and College Mottoes in the Elementary Latin Classroom.”
  • Albert Watanabe (LSU) will be speaking on “Same Ole Stories: Parallels to Greek Myths.”

10:30 Business Meeting

We look forward to seeing everyone and catching up with our friends and colleagues from around the state!

December 3, 2014

Volunteers Wanted!

Filed under: announcement,meetings,opportunities — Ann E. M. Ostrom @ 6:41 am

from Susann Lusnia (Tulane University) regarding the upcoming Joint Annual Meetings of the APA SCS and AIA in New Orleans, LA

Volunteers are needed to assist with conference registration in two shifts on Thursday (15/15), Friday (15/10), and Saturday (5/5) of the event. There are also a few spots to volunteer for special events: the SCS Presidential Panel (1), the SCS Play (1-2), and the SCS Plenary Session (1-2).

Volunteers who work 8 hours will be given free conference registration as a “thank you” for your service.

We’re using VolunteerSpot (the leading online signup and reminder tool) to organize the signups for the volunteer slots.

Here’s how it works in 3 easy steps:

1) Click this link to see our Sign-Up on VolunteerSpot: http://vols.pt/igF7cn
2) Review the options listed and choose the spot(s) you like.
3) Sign up! It’s Easy – you will NOT need to register an account or keep a password on VolunteerSpot.

Note: VolunteerSpot does not share your email address with anyone. If you prefer not to use your email address, please contact me and I can sign you up manually.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact Susann by emailing her: slusnia AT tulane DOT edu

June 16, 2014

Tulane Egyptologist to speak in Baton Rouge, June 17

Filed under: announcement,meetings — Ann E. M. Ostrom @ 11:40 am
Tags: , ,

TUESDAY, JUNE 17, 2014

Tulane Egyptologist Melinda Nelson-Hurst investigates one of the items in the university’s collection of ancient Egypt artifacts. (Photo from Melinda Nelson-Hurst)

DIGGING IN MUSEUMS & ARCHIVES: UNEARTHING TULANE UNIVERSITY’S EGYPTIAN COLLECTION
Dr. Melinda Nelson-Hurst (Tulane University)

5:30-7:30 p.m., Louisiana Art and Science Museum

To solve mysteries, Egyptologists not only search for clues about artifacts buried in the ground. They also explore those hidden from view in museum storage. For the past two years, Egyptologist Dr. Melinda Nelson-Hurst with Tulane University has been studying Tulane’s collection, including two mummies that were publicly unwrapped in the 1850s. Despite their sensational past – including having resided in a football stadium – and some relatively recent anthropological research, little was known about these artifacts until Dr. Nelson-Hurst and a physical anthropologist colleague at Tulane began to study them.

This talk is co-sponsored by the Louisiana Interest Group of the American Research Center in Egypt and the Louisiana Art and Science Museum.

The event will be held at the Louisiana Art and Science Museum (100 S River Rd, Baton Rouge, LA 70802).

Read more here

April 16, 2014

Report from LCA 2014

Filed under: announcement,meetings — Ann E. M. Ostrom @ 8:10 am

This post is not a replacement of the secretary’s minutes, but a general observation of the events of the meeting.

Look for an invitation to join an LCA Facebook Group!

CAMWS wants to give you money — investigate the BIG Initiative

Last but not least, introducing the Officers of LCA for 2014-15:

  • President Richard Warga
  • Vice President Kris Fletcher
  • Secretary/Treasurer Graham Waddill
  • Blog Administrator Ann Ostrom

March 10, 2014

date of LCA 2014

Filed under: announcement,meetings — Ann E. M. Ostrom @ 7:06 am

The next meeting of the Louisiana Classical Association will be April 12, 9am until noon in Baton Rouge on the LSU campus.  More details still forthcoming, but Rich Warga (LSU) and Kris Fletcher (LSU) will both be presenting on topics of interest.  Stay tuned, and save the date!

Council of the gods during the Trojan War. From left to right: Ares, Aphrodite or Eos (?), Artemis, Apollo, Zeus, Athena, Hera, Demeter or Thetis.  CLASSICAL ART RESEARCH CENTRE and THE BEAZLEY ARCHIVE

Council of the gods during the Trojan War. From left to right: Ares, Aphrodite or Eos (?), Artemis, Apollo, Zeus, Athena, Hera, Demeter or Thetis.
CLASSICAL ART RESEARCH CENTRE
and THE BEAZLEY ARCHIVE

October 9, 2013

urgent: update on the 2013 LCA Meeting

Filed under: announcement,meetings — Ann E. M. Ostrom @ 5:45 pm

From Laura Owen, Secretary-Treasurer of LCA:

Due to an overwhelming response from members about our fall date, we are moving our annual meeting to the spring. Potential dates are listed below. Please choose the date or dates you would be able to attend for our annual meeting. *

January 11th
February 8th
April 19th

You may leave your preference for the date of the meeting in the comments here if you wish.

October 5, 2013

LCA Meeting 19 October 2013

Filed under: announcement,meetings — Ann E. M. Ostrom @ 6:28 am
oct19

oct19

A message from LCA Secretary/Treasurer Laura Owen:

We are looking forward to an exciting annual meeting in just a few short weeks. We have had several people express an interest in talking about technology in the classroom, as well as AP Latin and Roman coins. If you are working on a research topic, and would like to present it to our group for feedback, even if you are interested in doing so in an informal way, we would love to hear from you!

If you have not done so already, please fill out the membership form. You can again opt to pay your dues via check or pay pal. I will be sending out pay pal links this week. In the last email I neglected to mention that dues will remain the same as they have been in the past–$20 per person. We use dues to fund our scholarships and run meetings, so thank you so much for renewing your membership!

Our annual meeting will be October 19th at LSU this year. No worries folks, the Ole Miss game is away that day. As soon as we have a time set, we will let you know, but until then, save the morning of October 19th for some fun Classics time!

June 29, 2013

ACL Institute: The N00b Report

Filed under: meetings — Ann E. M. Ostrom @ 8:00 am
Tags: , , ,

Maggie Wrenn and Ann Ostrom are attending the 2013 ACL Institute. Here is Maggie’s report.

Xαίρετε!

WP_000621 (1)

which goddess is this?

This is Maggie Wrenn reporting from the 2013 ACL Institute in Memphis, Tennessee! This is my first trip to the ACL Institute and so, as the Louisiana newbie, I thought I should give a report from the field. I should also add that I have an interesting perspective since I am currently a teacher of both Latin and Greek at the high school level.

The Institute kicked off with a diverse group of sessions ranging in theme from Caesar and AP Latin to Aphrodite in the Museum of Fine Arts. Since we are starting a 7th grade Classics program this year, I attended a session succinctly entitled “Fun with Projects” and was immediately sucked in by the excitement and creativity of the presenter, Donna Winstanley. The workshop included instructions, explanations, and examples of fun projects that the kids can do to help reinforce lessons and expand their knowledge of the subject material. Ms. Winstanley also had projects that her students use to help promote the classics in their school such as decorating a kleenex box with a classical theme. I had the opportunity to try my hand at this during the workshop portion of the talk and found it to be both educational and fun. My group made a Venus themed kleenex box and I can see how this could be a cool publicity project for JCL and also an opportunity to reinforce lessons learned in class (gods, symbols,myths, etc.). What a rousing session for my first taste of ACL Institute!

Since that first session, the other sessions I have attended, both today and yesterday, have varied in their quality and relevance. I did learn in one session that the committee writing the National Roman Civ Exam and the Etymology Exam will be distributing syllabi for these tests in an attempt to give students a better opportunity for success. As my students take both of these online exams, I was excited to hear this.

At another session I learned about a wonderful new online project that will shortly be available for Latin students all over the world. It is called the Latin Primary Source Project and was created by Racquel Yerbury. The goal of the project is for advanced Latin students to be presented with primary source material that does not have a published translation which they translate, annotate, and send in. The translation is then submitted to scholarly review and, potentially, published as part of a broader volume. What an amazing thing for high schoolers to be involved in!

Of course, as a Greek teacher, I was looking forward to attending the only session dedicated entirely to Greek. It was a panel presentation by Paul Properzio, Mark Pearsall, and our own Willie Major. It was enlightening to see how three different teachers tackle the same problems in the classroom. However, all of the speakers emphasized two points; take the time to teach the basics right and encourage students to comprehend what they read, not just translate it. Although this session was eye-opening in many ways, I can’t help but be disappointed by the lack of Greek related sessions. There were NO sessions on Greek life and culture which I found surprising.

I have met many new colleagues and seen many old friends over the past few days. I was pleased to see Dennis Webb and Willie Major who have both been so helpful and kind. I met teachers from across the country who face the same struggles as I do everyday (lack of space, student disinterest, etc.) and I was able to hear some of their solutions and attempted solutions. I even met a fellow Greek teacher all the way from Ontario, Canada who was full of great ideas that I hope to integrate into my own classroom.

As you perhaps can tell I am having a great time at “big people JCL” convention. Although there are no spirit contests or certamen matches there is still a great time to be had by all. The receptions every night have been really fun and Ann and I have mixed and mingled the night away. It is hard to believe that this ACL Institute is coming to an end, but tomorrow is the last day (time to pick up the books I want at 50% off!).

In closing let me just say that this trip has been a wonderful experience for me as a new teacher. I have gotten resources, planning materials and, best of all, new ideas that I can’t wait to integrate into my own classroom this fall. Every year we encourage our students to go to NJCL convention and those who do come back and tell their friends that they “have to go to nationals!” and “it’s super fun”. Well I have been to ACL and I am here to tell you that you should must go to ACL Institute at least once. Join with your fellow Greek and Latin teachers from across the nation/globe and share ideas, get feedback, and have fun! See you in Williamsburg…

June 28, 2013

Dispatches from ACL Institute day 1

Filed under: meetings,Uncategorized — Ann E. M. Ostrom @ 10:43 pm
Tags: , , ,

WP_000609 (1)Maggie Wrenn and Ann Ostrom drove from Baton Rouge to theUniversity of Memphis on Wednesday. Here is Ann’s report:

We did not participate in any pre-Institute workshops, but chose instead to find barbecue at Central BBQ.

WP_000612 (1)Sessions did not begin on Thursday until 1:30, so we took the opportunity to do some sightseeing. Graceland? Beale Street? Fie on these places. We happened upon Rhodes College and decided to wander around the grounds. The buildings were lovely Tennessee limestone (I think, I’m no geologist), and the campus library was full of cushy chairs and nooks for studying.

Then it was off to the Brooks Museum of Art, which houses some nice classical pieces, including a Roman Lar, a mosaic featuring the head of a bull, and a head of Nero. [pictures will follow later when internet connection is more reliable.]

American Classical League

American Classical League

After lunch, the sessions began, and the teaching resources and materials area opened! On the first day alone, presenters shared with their audiences such varied topics as themes and essential questions in the AP test, projects, Aphrodite in art in Boston, using technology, AP statistical results, report on online contests, kinds and strategies of assessment, and the image of home in the Aeneid. Something for almost everyone (a Greek topics will show up on Day 2).

I feel I learned or could adapt something from each of the workshops I saw that first day. AP remains a personal challenge to me, but I have a few new things I might like to try this year, and Bob Cape’s comments about student performance this year helped solidify some things about AP grading and scoring for me.

However, I now have to complain about the fact that, because I was attending some popular talks, I did not always receive a handout. Worse, very few people (but not none, so yay for the technocrats) said they could provide us with a link to the handout in some sort of cloud storage; most apologized and asked that we send an email to request a copy later. [As I write this in the middle of Day 2, this problem of handouts and lack of cloud sharing continues.]

We are not the only members of a Louisiana contingent; Willie Major is presenting on Greek on Day 2, and Dennis Webb is also here in his capacity as a committee member in the NJCL.

Another report on Day 2 will follow!

June 13, 2013

ACL in Memphis

Filed under: meetings — Ann E. M. Ostrom @ 8:02 am

The date of this year’s institute, hosted by the University of Memphis, is fast approaching (June 27-9). How many Louisiana representatives will be there? I will attend together with my colleague from Runnels, Maggie Wrenn. Anyone else?

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