The Louisiana Classicist

October 1, 2017

“Complexity and Contradiction in Diocletian’s Palace” – a Lecture from LOYNO AIA (10/3/2017)

Filed under: announcement — Ann E. M. Ostrom @ 8:23 am
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from the Loyola New Orleans AIA chapter“:

Complexity and Contradiction in Diocletian’s Palace

Date: Tuesday, October 3, 2017

Time: 8:00 pm to 9:00 pm

Location: Whitney Bank Presentation Room, Thomas Hall

A Lecture by

Dr. Goran Nikšić

City of Split, Service for the Old City Core,

Obala kneza Branimira

The Charles Eliot Norton Memorial Lectureship of the AIA

free admission and free parking on campus (West Road Garage and the Horseshoe)

Co-sponsored by the Department of Classical Studies and the New Orleans Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

The meaning of Diocletian’s Palace has been oversimplified in most of scientific research during the past two centuries. Although the original purpose of this building has recently been established as the imperial manufacture of textiles, the consequences of such new historical approach on the understanding of the architecture have not been contemplated. The well-known interpretation of the Palace as a classical monument is being substituted with an analysis based on Venturi’s terms, describing the complexity and contradiction of the building on both formal and functional levels. The general design is both schematic and intricate, utilitarian and symbolic. Architectural elements depart from their usual treatment – columns support themselves and are decorative rather than structural, spaces are at the same time open and enclosed. On the functional level there is a clash between the industrial and domestic use, between the profane and sacred, proletarian and imperial. However, these contradictions and ambiguities were not intentional; they are a result of the pragmatic procedure of the architect obliged to solve the seemingly incompatible requirements by the emperor. Following many centuries of constant change and adaptation to the demands of a living city, today the Palace is faced with a challenge of being reduced to a mere tourist attraction. Understanding of the real meaning of the place as a complex, ambiguous and contradictory building could help rectify such a one-dimensional view.

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“History of Jews in Split” – a Lecture at LOYNO (10/2/2017)

Filed under: Uncategorized — Ann E. M. Ostrom @ 8:17 am
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from the AIA website:


History of Jews in Split

Sponsored by New Orleans Society and the Department of Classical Studies

AIA Society: New Orleans
Monday, October 2, 2017 – 8:00pm

Location:
Whitney Bank Presentation Room, Thomas Hall, Loyola University
6363 St. Charles Avenue
New Orleans, LA 70118
United States
Website:
http://calendar.loyno.edu/2017-10-02

A Lecture by

Dr. Ana Lebl

Split, Croatia

Monday, October 2, 2017

Whitney Bank Presentation Room

Thomas Hall, Loyola University

free admission and free parking on campus (West Road Garage and the Horseshoe)

Co-sponsored by the Department of Classical Studies and the New Orleans Society of the Archaeological Institute of America

Archaeological and historic sources provide evidence for the strong Jewish presence on the Eastern Adriatic coast since the antiquity. Jews had an important role in trade and other economic activities, particularly in Salona, the capital city of the Roman province of Dalmatia and the most important harbor and market place in that part of the Empire. Based on historical and archaeological research, we have recently proved the presence of a substantial Jewish community within Diocletian’s Palace in Split, situated only a few miles from Salona. Although the Jewish community of Split never surpassed 300 people, it has a rich history and has been very important for the economic and cultural life of the city. In the 16th century, when Sephardic Jews from the Ottoman Empire and from Venice settled in Split, a new synagogue was established in the northwest part of Diocletian’s Palace, in the midst of the Jewish quarter, which was later called the ghetto. In the second half of the sixteenth century Daniel Rodrigez, a Spanish Jew from Venice enlarged the port of Split and founded what became the largest lazaretto in the Mediterranean. He also established the Jewish cemetery on the Marjan hill overlooking the city. The eighteenth century saw the arrival of the Ashkenazi Jews, and modern developments they brought to the city. In the nineteenth century cement industry, a distillery, a book shop, a print house, and a bank were all introduced by several prominent Jewish families. Half of the community perished in the Holocaust, and during the recent war in Bosnia, Jewish refugees from Sarajevo found safe heaven in Split. Today a tiny, but vibrant community of around 100 members plans to open a Jewish museum and thus become more attractive, boost local Jewish identity, enhance the quality of the community life and make it sustainable.

August 5, 2017

LCA Annual Meeting 2017

Filed under: announcement — Ann E. M. Ostrom @ 8:18 am
Tags:

From Mallory Monaco Caterine, LCA President (Tulane University:

Save the date! The Louisiana Classical Association’s 2017 fall gathering will be held at Tulane, Jones Hall 204, on Saturday, September 30. We will begin with an informal lunch at 12:30pm, followed by presentations on research and teaching by our members. The business meeting will take place at 3:30pm, after which we will adjourn to a happy hour at a nearby location TBD.

If you’re interested in presenting some of your work, please email at mmonaco AT tulane DOT edu at your earliest convenience.

Lastly, please let us know if you’ll be able to attend! You should be receiving an email message from our secretary, Graham Waddill, soon with registration and annual dues payment information.

August 4, 2017

poll #1

Filed under: Uncategorized — Ann E. M. Ostrom @ 8:15 am
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August 3, 2017

schools seeking Latin teachers

Filed under: Uncategorized — Ann E. M. Ostrom @ 8:04 am

There are currently two positions open in Louisiana

Riverdale High School
240 Riverdale Dr.
Jefferson, La. 70058

“Immediate Latin Teacher opening at “A” rated IB traditional public school.Fall Semester Latin I/II Spring Semester Latin III/IV.”

Glasgow Middle School
1676 Glasgow Ave
Baton Rouge, LA 70808
contact: ehoward1@ebrschools.org.

“We are in need of a Latin A/B, I, II teacher.The current textbooks are Ecce Romani and several others.”

September 12, 2016

2016 Annual meeting

Filed under: Uncategorized — Ann E. M. Ostrom @ 5:39 pm

From Nathalie Roy

The Louisiana Classical Association’s fall gathering will be held at LSU, Hodges Hall 324, on Saturday, October 8, 2016, with morning refreshments and fellowship starting at 8:30 AM and presentations at 9:00 AM. Presentations will include an interactive session on gamifying your formative assessments and another on a new venture about ancient leadership. Our annual meeting will begin at 11 AM. The gathering will conclude around noon with a lunch option at a nearby restaurant. Please note that the Louisiana Junior Classical League’s Fall Forum will begin at 1 PM at St. Joseph’s Academy, near LSU’s campus.

Please let us know if you’ll be able to attend! You should be receiving an email message from our secretary, Graham Waddill, soon with registration and annual dues payment information.

On a personal note, I truly enjoy these annual gatherings because I never get to see any of you ever, and you should all come. There will be time built into our schedule to visit with others and share flood stories and classroom successes. Please come!

– Nathalie

 

October 14, 2015

LSMSA Seeking Temporary Help in the Spring

Filed under: Uncategorized — Ann E. M. Ostrom @ 5:19 pm

From Louisiana School for Math, Science and Arts:

Greetings from Natchitoches! My name is Kristi Key, and I’m the new Director of Academic Services at The Louisiana School for Math, Science, and the Arts. We have a thriving Latin program here at LSMSA, but our resident Latin professor is going on sabbatical this Spring. Our hopeful replacement finds herself committed elsewhere, and so I am writing to inquire if you know of any recent graduates who may be interested in relocating to Natchitoches for the Spring to teach two sections of Latin 1 and one section of Latin 2.

Contact Ms. Key at kkey AT lsmsa DOT edu for more details.

Nathalie Roy also mentions that The Dunham School in Baton Rouge might still be seeking someone to cover some Maternity Leave. No further details on that possibility though.

October 9, 2015

Fall 2015 Meeting + Schedule

Filed under: Uncategorized — Ann E. M. Ostrom @ 6:46 am

Here is the program for the Fall 2015 Meeting of the Louisiana Classical Association:

9:00–9:30: Registration and Coffee

9:30–10:20: Session One

Kevin Woram, Tulane University, “The Roman Military Marriage Ban: Re-examining its Actual Effects on Soldiers’ Lives”

Mary-Evelyn Farrior, Tulane University, “The Contrada Agnese Project: A Survey of Recent Fieldwork at Morgantina (Enna, Sicily)”

10:20–10:30: Coffee Break

10:45–11:35: Session Two

Willie Major, Louisiana State University, “Hercules vs. the Year 2014: Using Three New Movies in the Classroom”

Nathalie Roy, Episcopal High School of Baton Rouge, “Service Learning with Latin”

11:35–11:50: Coffee Break

11:50–12:30: Business Meeting

October 5, 2015

Filed under: Uncategorized — Ann E. M. Ostrom @ 6:55 pm

An announcement from Emily Batinski (LSU):

Julius Caesar, De Bello Gallico et al., 1450-1475 Manuscript on vellum, illuminated by the Hippolyta Master, Italy, Milan, c. 1450-1475

How to Make Latin Prose Easier to Read: Techniques for Simplifying Complicated Syntax

Do your students panic when faced with a syntactically complex sentence in prose? Are they unsure even where to start? This webinar will offer some strategies for demystifying Latin prose syntax. Using examples from Caesar’s De Bello Gallico and Cicero’s Pro Caelio, we will work through strategies that will increase students’ confidence in reading Latin prose. Materials for the webinar will be available as downloadable documents in advance from Google Drive.

Monday, October 12, 2015

6:30 p.m. EST

Presenter:  Victoria Jordan, who teaches Latin (and sometimes Greek) at the Ellis School in Pittsburgh, spent the summer reading Dante in Sienna as part of an NEH institute. She received her PhD from Boston College with a specialization in the development of Latin in late antiquity and the concomitant emergence of vernacular languages.

This webinar is a project of the National Committee for Latin and Greek. There is no fee for participation; to register contact nclg.chair@gmail.com.

April 22, 2015

Annual Meeting of LCA and Special Guest Lecture

Filed under: announcement,meetings — Ann E. M. Ostrom @ 6:03 am
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Two announcements from Graham Waddill, Secretary-Treasurer of the LCA:

First, a guest lecturer at LSU on Thursday, 23 April at 4:30:

DEPARTMENT
 OF
 FOREIGN 
LANGUAGES
 AND 
LITERATURES
PRESENTS
 A 
LECTURE 
BY
SALVADOR
 BARTERA
THE
 ANNALS
 OF
 TACITUS:
FROM
 OBSCURITY
 TO 
BESTSELLER
April
 23, 
2015,
 4:30
234
 PRESCOTT
 HALL

Abstract: This
 lecture 
will 
discuss 
the 
tradition
 of 
Tacitus’ 
text 
(mainly 
the 
Annals),
 as 
it 
survived and
was
 “rediscovered” 
in
 the 
Renaissance,
 explaining
 how
 and
 why
 we 
call
 it
 Annals,
 divide
 it 
in the
 way
 we
 do, 
etc. 
It
 will
 also 
present
 some 
examples
 of 
interpretive 
issues 
that
 made
 the
 Annals popular 
but
 at 
the
 same
 time
 “dangerous”
 in
 the 
late 
Renaissance,
 when 
the
 Annals 
were
 used both
 as 
a
 “guide 
to 
tyranny” 
and 
the 
opposite,
 the
 so‐called
 red
 and 
black
 Tacitus.

Dr.
 Bartera 
is 
Assistant
 Professor 
of 
Classics,
 Department
 of
 Classical
 and
 Modern
 Languages
 and Literatures,
 at
 Mississippi
 State
 University.

The second, to remind our members of the LCA meeting on Saturday, 25 April, on the third floor of Hodges Hall on the LSU campus. The agenda will be:

9:00-9:30 Registration & Light refreshments

9:30-10:30 Speakers

  • Christopher Caterine (Tulane) will be speaking on “A Minor Inconvenience: Cato the Younger and the Cognomen ‘Uticensis.'”
  • Kris Fletcher (LSU) will be speaking on “Using University and College Mottoes in the Elementary Latin Classroom.”
  • Albert Watanabe (LSU) will be speaking on “Same Ole Stories: Parallels to Greek Myths.”

10:30 Business Meeting

We look forward to seeing everyone and catching up with our friends and colleagues from around the state!

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